August Wrap-up

Total Number of Books: 3
Total Number of Pages: 739
Average Pages per Book: 246
Average Rating: 4

This was far from my best reading month, but I have legitimate excuses!  At the beginning of August, Ryan’s family and friends arrived in Vancouver from England. We spent some time touring around Vancouver, then WE GOT MARRIED at the gorgeous Lac Le Jeune Wilderness Resort. It was an absolutely PERFECT day, and an amazing time spent with family and friends celebrating!

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Here are the books I read in August:

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Black Klansman by Ron Stallworth    ★★★☆☆ (3.5)

I was ecstatic to win this book in a giveaway by Raincoast books, as it had been on my radar! A Black Police Detective infiltrating the KKK!?!?!? The premise instantly intrigued me. While I found the book absolutely fascinating, the writing was not overly captivating. Interesting, but not “wow” for me. I feel like this COULD have been one of those amazing, mind-blowing books, but it just fell a little flat.

The Rain Watcher by Tatiana de Rosnay    ★★★★☆

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A moody and atmospheric read, delving into family relationships and the dark secrets and memories that lay beneath the surface of the beautiful and iconic setting. I don’t want to say too much, as I’m in the process of writing a full review. I will say that it’s the perfect autumn read (expected to be published October 23), and I love love loved the main character Linden.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows    ★★★★★

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I made myself read this (or rather listen to it via audiobook) before watching the movie. I ADORED it!!!! At first it was a bit difficult to keep track of all the characters, but I completely fell in love with each and every one of them – well, maybe not Mark. If epistolary novels are not your thing, then you probably won’t enjoy this; however, I found the letters incredibly entertaining, and they allowed the authentic voice of each character to shine through. While reading it, I kept wondering, “How on earth are they going to make this into a movie?” I think they did an excellent job! I’m definitely buying the book and reading it. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the book OR movie.

Now that summer holidays are over, I am hoping to get more reading done! I am currently reading A Storm of Swords, A Place for Us, and Educated. I also just received The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle, and it sounds like such a good one that I am being swayed to start it, even though I already have enough books on the go. Ahhhh!!!!


Have you read any of these books? Thoughts?

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Sunday #Shelfie Feature | Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

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My living room bookshelf contains exactly 107 books. Some are books I’ve read, and others I have yet to read (my book buying is out of control at this point…).

Each Sunday, I use a random number generator, and feature the book that corresponds to that number.

If you want to join in the fun and start your own Sunday Shelfie Feature, please do!

This week’s feature is number 63 on my shelf. I have an entire shelf dedicated to the Harry Potter series, and I am running out of room! So here we go with book #63:


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Title: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Author: J.K. Rowling
Publication date: May 1, 2004
My Rating: ★★★★★

 

Goodreads Synopsis:
Harry Potter’s third year at Hogwarts is full of new dangers. A convicted murderer, Sirius Black, has broken out of Azkaban prison, and it seems he’s after Harry. Now Hogwarts is being patrolled by the dementors, the Azkaban guards who are hunting Sirius. But Harry can’t imagine that Sirius or, for that matter, the evil Lord Voldemort could be more frightening than the dementors themselves, who have the terrible power to fill anyone they come across with aching loneliness and despair. Meanwhile, life continues as usual at Hogwarts. A top-of-the-line broom takes Harry’s success at Quidditch, the sport of the Wizarding world, to new heights. A cute fourth-year student catches his eye. And he becomes close with the new Defense of the Dark Arts teacher, who was a childhood friend of his father. Yet despite the relative safety of life at Hogwarts and the best efforts of the dementors, the threat of Sirius Black grows ever closer. But if Harry has learned anything from his education in wizardry, it is that things are often not what they seem. Tragic revelations, heartwarming surprises, and high-stakes magical adventures await the boy wizard in this funny and poignant third installment of the beloved series.

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I have a lot of love for the Harry Potter series. I grew up reading the series, and they will always have a very special place in my heart. I’ve re-read them over and over again, and I still enjoy them each time. The Prisoner of Azkaban is definitely one of my favourites of the series. The mood darkens, the characters become more complex, and we’re introduced to some new characters (*cough*SiriusandLupin*cough*) who become some of my favourites. With each book, we unearth more about the fantastic creatures and enchanting aspects of the wizarding world. I will always delight in stepping through the pages into Harry’s magical journey.

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(from page 63 – the number I pulled)

“Crabbe and Goyle seemed to exist to do Malfoy’s bidding. They were both wide and muscly; Crabbe was was the taller, with a pudding-basin haircut and a very thick neck; Goyle had short, bristly hair and long, gorilla arms.

‘Well, look who it is,’ said Malfoy in his usual lazy drawl, pulling open the compartment door. ‘Potty and the Weasel.’

Crabbe and Goyle chuckled trollishly.


Hope you’ve enjoyed this book feature. Which book from the Harry Potter series is your favourite!?

If any book bloggers out there want to join in on the Sunday Shelfie Feature fun, just tag me in your posts – I’d love to see them!

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Tuesday: First Chapter, First Paragraph

I’m going to join in on the First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros fun, hosted by I’d Rather Be at the Beach.  Each Tuesday, she shares the first paragraph(s) of a current read, or book she will soon be reading.

I’m sharing the first two paragraphs of a book I just started.

rain watcher.jpgTitle: The Rain Watcher
Author: Tatiana de Rosnay
Genre: Historical Fiction
Expected Publication: October 23, 2018
Publisher: St. Martin’s Press


“I will start with the tree. Because everything begins, and ends, with the tree. The tree is the tallest one. It was planted way before the others. I’m not sure how old it is, exactly. Perhaps three or four hundred years old. It is ancient and powerful. It has weathered terrible storms, braced against unbridled winds. It is not afraid.

The tree is not like the others. It has its own rhythm. Spring starts later for it, while all the others are already blossoming. Come late April, the new oval leaves sprout slowly, on the top and middle branches only. Otherwise, it looks dead. Gnarled, gray, and withered. It likes to pretend to be dead. That’s how clever it is. Then, suddenly, like a huge explosion, all the buds flourish. The tree triumphs with its pale green crown.”


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I read Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay as I was traveling through Europe by train. Although it was quite some time ago, I remember that her writing captivated me. I haven’t read any of her other books, but I am already intrigued by the introduction to The Rain Watcher. I tend to like books that are emotional journeys and character-driven. This intro is beautifully written, and I’m anxious to see what the rest of the book has to offer!

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The first new novel in four years from the beloved superstar author of Sarah’s Key, a heartbreaking and uplifting story of family secrets and devastating disaster, in the tradition of THE NEST.

The Rain Watcher is a powerful family drama set in Paris as the Malegarde family gathers to celebrate the father’s 70th birthday. Their hidden fears and secrets are slowly unraveled as the City of Light undergoes a stunning natural disaster. Seen through the eyes of charismatic photographer Linden Malegarde, the youngest son, all members of the family will have to fight to keep their unity against tragic circumstances.

In this profound and intense novel of love and redemption, De Rosnay demonstrates all of her writer’s skills both as an incredible storyteller but also as a soul seeker.


What do you think? Would you keep reading?

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Book Review | Fawkes by Nadine Brandes

 

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Title: Fawkes
Author: Nadine Brandes
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Publication Date: July 10th 2018
Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult, Historical Fiction
Rating: ★★★★✰

 

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Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England.

Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for peace, no one listens until he finally calls for death.

But what if death finds him first?

Keepers think the Igniters caused the plague. Igniters think the Keepers did. But all Thomas knows is that the Stone Plague infecting his eye is spreading. And if he doesn’t do something soon, he’ll be a lifeless statue. So when his Keeper father, Guy Fawkes, invites him to join the Gunpowder Plot—claiming it will put an end to the plague—Thomas is in.

The plan: use 36 barrels of gunpowder to blow up the Igniter King.

The problem: Doing so will destroy the family of the girl Thomas loves. But backing out of the plot will send his father and the other plotters to the gallows. To save one, Thomas will lose the other.

No matter Thomas’s choice, one thing is clear: once the decision is made and the color masks have been put on, there’s no turning back.

Goodreads | Amazon | Chapters Indigo

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fawkes2.jpgFirst of all, can we please take a moment to appreciate how STUNNING the cover of this book is!? The cover was 100% the reason I gravitated towards this book. I’m happy I did.

The protagonist of the book is Thomas, Guy Fawkes’ son. Essentially it is a coming-of-age story in which he learns more about himself, his father, the plagued world of Igniters and Keepers, and of course love. Although some parts seemed a little drawn out (it could probably be 50 pages shorter), the rest of the story kept up a pretty good pace.

I found the world absolutely fascinating. For the first 200 pages, I was constantly asking questions about how the whole colour power thing worked, and I felt like the difference between the Igniters and Keepers was so vague. When I reached page 204, I realized that the reader was kept in the dark just as Thomas had been until that moment. Thomas actually says on that page, “Finally, I was getting answers,” and that’s exactly how I felt! It was at this point that my history nerdiness crept in and I was giddy to see how Brandes has taken the conflicts between religious sects during this period in England, and rewritten it as a war between two groups with differing magical practices: the Keepers and the Igniters. All of the pieces came together in my mind, which of course I exclaimed out loud; then I had to explain to Ryan everything that had happened in the book, how I had been feeling about it, as well as the revelation that had just occurred.

_Travel is never predictable. That's how adventure shows up._.pngI did struggle to connect with most of the main characters. Thomas became slightly annoying at times, and I wanted so much more from his father (as I’m sure he did as well). We also meet Fawkes’ co-conspirators (who really existed!), and Emma (who is entirely fictional). I think that the choice to include Emma – strong, determined, and independent – was a great one. She was definitely my favourite character.

I appreciate this unique combination of historical fiction and fantasy. I was also highly invested in the setting, as I have studied the time period throughout various history courses and have visited many of the locations in my travels. I also liked how the novel delved into some of the complexities of wars, disease, and racism – rampant in 1600’s England – but also of relevance at pretty much any point in human history.

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Despite some points that lagged, and my inability to connect to some characters, I did really enjoy this book! Magic-infused 1600’s England was a fun (and slightly terrifying) place to hang out for awhile.

★★★★✰

Have you ever read a book that combined historical fiction and fantasy?

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Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with a complimentary e-copy of this book in exchange for a review.  All views and opinions expressed are my honest and unbiased, as I was not required to write a positive review.

 

Sunday #Shelfie Feature | Carve the Mark

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My living room bookshelf contains exactly 107 books. Some are books I’ve read, and others I have yet to read (my book buying is out of control at this point…).

Each Sunday, I use a random number generator, and feature the book that corresponds to that number. See last week’s post here.

If you want to join in the fun and start your own Sunday Shelfie Feature, please do! Of course, there are many ways you could choose to feature a book, but I thought this would be fun, and should keep me going for awhile…

This week’s feature is number 20 on my shelf:


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Title: Carve the Mark
Author: Veronica Roth
Publication date: January 17, 2017
My Rating: Unread

Goodreads Synopsis:
Cyra is the sister of the brutal tyrant who rules the Shotet people. Cyra’s currentgift gives her pain and power—something her brother exploits, using her to torture his enemies. But Cyra is much more than just a blade in her brother’s hand: she is resilient, quick on her feet, and smarter than he knows.
Akos is the son of a farmer and an oracle from the frozen nation-planet of Thuvhe. Protected by his unusual currentgift, Akos is generous in spirit, and his loyalty to his family is limitless. Once Akos and his brother are captured by enemy Shotet soldiers, Akos is desperate to get his brother out alive—no matter what the cost.
Then Akos is thrust into Cyra’s world, and the enmity between their countries and families seems insurmountable. Will they help each other to survive, or will they destroy one another?
Carve the Mark is Veronica Roth’s stunning portrayal of the power of friendship—and love—in a galaxy filled with unexpected gifts.

My Thoughts (2)
This book has been part of my TBR for a few months now. I received a free book box from the lovely Chapters Indigo, which featured The Fates Divide by Veronica Roth. Since I hadn’t read the first book, I obviously had to buy it! Based on the description, I think this will be a quick read that I will like, but probably not loooove. Let’s hope it proves me wrong (when I ever get around to reading it…)

My Thoughts (1)

(from page 20 – the number I pulled)

“And then the screen fixed next to the door flickered and switched off. All the lights in the room switched off, too, and the ones that glowed under the door, in the hallway. Whatever Riha had been about to say froze on her lips.”


Hope you’ve enjoyed this book feature. Have you read Carve the Mark? Did you like it?

If any book bloggers out there want to join in on the Sunday Shelfie Feature fun, just tag me in your posts – I’d love to see them!

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Book Review | Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

Do you listen to audiobooks? They’re relatively new to me, and I must admit that a good audiobook can be the perfect way to experience a story. I first started listening to them out of frustration, really; I was slogging my way through the fifth novel in the Outlander series – The Fiery Cross – and I was struggling to get through it. I had abandoned it months before, opting for lighter and shorter reads. Determined to finally finish it, I checked out the audiobook version from my library’s app. Although seeing the length of the recording (55 hours and 34 minutes *GASP*) was daunting, I soon realized that listening to an audiobook made monotonous household tasks – cleaning, laundry, cooking, and snow shoveling – SO much more entertaining! This also happened to be last winter, when our tractor was broken down for the duration of the season and we got seemingly endless piles and piles of snow; I finished the second half of the audiobook ONLY listening to it whilst shoveling snow.
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I’ve also recently listened to Amanda Lindhout’s A House in the Sky and Naomi Klein’s book about climate change: This Changes Everything. Although I enjoyed those audiobooks, Born a Crime, narrated by Trevor Noah (the author), was a completely unique experience. I had seen various clips of Trevor Noah on YouTube, but to be honest I didn’t know much about him. I had been eyeing up Born a Crime every time I entered a bookstore. I had read the synopsis and a few reviews; I was not-so-patiently waiting for it to come on sale… aaaand it didn’t. I recently subscribed to Audible, and when I first saw Born a Crime on there, I was hesitant, mostly because I had been waiting to buy the print version for so long. Upon noticing that it was narrated by Trevor himself, and after skimming a few reviews, I dived in.
I haven’t read the print version of the book (I think I’ll buy it eventually… if it ever comes on sale!) but I wholeheartedly recommend listening to the audiobook regardless. Perhaps it was destiny that the hardcover book just wasn’t coming on sale. Even if you’ve read the print version, LISTEN TO THE AUDIOBOOK! Sorry, I feel like I am shouting this from the mountaintops, but that’s how good it is!
Listening to this book felt like sitting down with Trevor Noah over coffee and hearing him tell his life story. He is such a natural storyteller, and is downright hilarious; he had me regularly laughing and guffawing out loud, which garnered concerned looks from my fiancé. His voice brought this emotional, brutal, insightful and hilarious story to LIFE.
Trevor Noah was born at the tail end of apartheid: the period of systemic, institutional, government-sanctioned racial segregation and discrimination in South Africa. He was born to a deeply religious, independent, and charismatic mother. He starts out by describing how he was, quite literally, born a crime:

“On February 20, 1984, my mother checked into Hillbrow Hospital for a scheduled C-section delivery. Estranged from her family, pregnant by a man she could not be seen with in public, she was alone. The doctors took her up to the delivery room, cut open her belly, and reached in and pulled out a half-white, half-black child who violated any number of laws, statutes, and regulations—I was born a crime.”

As a mixed-race child, Trevor straddled the various groups in South Africa – he looked “colored,” but identified as black. His childhood was complicated, as he tried to find his identity and place in a divided society. He effortlessly weaves hilarious anecdotes and escapades with heart wrenching and tragic accounts of poverty, violence and racism. His story is both entertaining and insightful. I thoroughly enjoyed listening to it – and in fact, I actually cleaned and organized beyond what I needed to, just to keep listening. I learned a lot about life during and following apartheid in South Africa, and I completely fell in love with Trevor and his mother.

Now I am listening to it for a second time with my fiancé, because I just had to share it with him. If you end up listening to it, I’d love to know your thoughts about it.

Title: Born a Crime
Author: Trevor Noah
Publication Date: November 15, 2016
My Rating: ★★★★★

(P.S. The Hardcover book is actually on sale now… now you know my next book purchase!)

Goodreads | Amazon | Chapters


Do you listen to audiobooks? Please leave your awesome audiobook recommendations in the comments below.

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Friday Book Beginning | A Place For Us

Welcome to Friday’s Book Beginning, hosted by Rose City ReaderPlease join me every Friday to share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires.

1twitter.PNG“As Amar watched the hall fill with guests arriving for his sister’s wedding, he promised himself he would stay.”

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

This beginning makes me wonder: why would Amar consider leaving his sister’s wedding? Did she invite him and expect him to not show up? Are they on speaking terms? What has happened throughout their relationship as siblings?

I’m not very far in to this novel, but I can already tell I will enjoy it. I love stories that delve deeply into identity, family dynamics and relationships.

The first novel from Sarah Jessica Parker’s new imprint, SJP for Hogarth, A Place for Us is a deeply moving and resonant story of love, identity and belonging.

Goodreads | Amazon | Chapters

Wishing you all a wonderful weekend. Make sure you take some time to relax & read!


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