Book Review | Fawkes by Nadine Brandes

 

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Title: Fawkes
Author: Nadine Brandes
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Publication Date: July 10th 2018
Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult, Historical Fiction
Rating: ★★★★✰

 

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Thomas Fawkes is turning to stone, and the only cure to the Stone Plague is to join his father’s plot to assassinate the king of England.

Silent wars leave the most carnage. The wars that are never declared, but are carried out in dark alleys with masks and hidden knives. Wars where color power alters the natural rhythm of 17th century London. And when the king calls for peace, no one listens until he finally calls for death.

But what if death finds him first?

Keepers think the Igniters caused the plague. Igniters think the Keepers did. But all Thomas knows is that the Stone Plague infecting his eye is spreading. And if he doesn’t do something soon, he’ll be a lifeless statue. So when his Keeper father, Guy Fawkes, invites him to join the Gunpowder Plot—claiming it will put an end to the plague—Thomas is in.

The plan: use 36 barrels of gunpowder to blow up the Igniter King.

The problem: Doing so will destroy the family of the girl Thomas loves. But backing out of the plot will send his father and the other plotters to the gallows. To save one, Thomas will lose the other.

No matter Thomas’s choice, one thing is clear: once the decision is made and the color masks have been put on, there’s no turning back.

Goodreads | Amazon | Chapters Indigo

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fawkes2.jpgFirst of all, can we please take a moment to appreciate how STUNNING the cover of this book is!? The cover was 100% the reason I gravitated towards this book. I’m happy I did.

The protagonist of the book is Thomas, Guy Fawkes’ son. Essentially it is a coming-of-age story in which he learns more about himself, his father, the plagued world of Igniters and Keepers, and of course love. Although some parts seemed a little drawn out (it could probably be 50 pages shorter), the rest of the story kept up a pretty good pace.

I found the world absolutely fascinating. For the first 200 pages, I was constantly asking questions about how the whole colour power thing worked, and I felt like the difference between the Igniters and Keepers was so vague. When I reached page 204, I realized that the reader was kept in the dark just as Thomas had been until that moment. Thomas actually says on that page, “Finally, I was getting answers,” and that’s exactly how I felt! It was at this point that my history nerdiness crept in and I was giddy to see how Brandes has taken the conflicts between religious sects during this period in England, and rewritten it as a war between two groups with differing magical practices: the Keepers and the Igniters. All of the pieces came together in my mind, which of course I exclaimed out loud; then I had to explain to Ryan everything that had happened in the book, how I had been feeling about it, as well as the revelation that had just occurred.

_Travel is never predictable. That's how adventure shows up._.pngI did struggle to connect with most of the main characters. Thomas became slightly annoying at times, and I wanted so much more from his father (as I’m sure he did as well). We also meet Fawkes’ co-conspirators (who really existed!), and Emma (who is entirely fictional). I think that the choice to include Emma – strong, determined, and independent – was a great one. She was definitely my favourite character.

I appreciate this unique combination of historical fiction and fantasy. I was also highly invested in the setting, as I have studied the time period throughout various history courses and have visited many of the locations in my travels. I also liked how the novel delved into some of the complexities of wars, disease, and racism – rampant in 1600’s England – but also of relevance at pretty much any point in human history.

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Despite some points that lagged, and my inability to connect to some characters, I did really enjoy this book! Magic-infused 1600’s England was a fun (and slightly terrifying) place to hang out for awhile.

★★★★✰

Have you ever read a book that combined historical fiction and fantasy?

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Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with a complimentary e-copy of this book in exchange for a review.  All views and opinions expressed are my honest and unbiased, as I was not required to write a positive review.

 

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